By Elly van Gelderen

ISBN-10: 9027212082

ISBN-13: 9789027212085

The English language in its complicated shapes and varieties alterations speedy. This completely revised edition has been refreshed with present examples of swap and has been up-to-date concerning archeological study. such a lot feedback mentioned via clients and reviewers were integrated, for example, a genealogy for Germanic has been further, Celtic impact is highlighted even more, there's extra at the beginning of Chancery English, and inner and exterior switch are mentioned in a lot better element. The philosophy of the revised publication continues to be an identical with an emphasis at the linguistic heritage and on utilizing actual texts. My viewers continues to be undergraduates (and starting graduates). The pursuits of the category and the ebook are to return to acknowledge English from a variety of time sessions, which will learn each one level with a thesaurus, to get an knowing of average language swap, inner and exterior, and to appreciate anything approximately language typology throughout the emphasis at the switch from man made to analytic.
This booklet has a spouse web site: http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/z.183.website

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Additional info for A History of the English Language: Revised edition

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An external reason for this date is that printing is introduced. The Early Modern period is difficult to date exactly. It depends on whether we take political events such as the Restoration (of the British monarchy) in 1660, or the Declaration of (US) Independence in 1776, or some other external date to be important. The year 1700 has been chosen because the spelling is more or less standardized, the Great Vowel Shift is nearly complete, and English speakers start to spread the language around the world.

Affricates, [t∫, dʒ] in English, are mixtures of a stop and a fricative. Nasals and liquids have a lot in common with vowels in that they are voiced and can be syllables on their own. Nasals are formed by letting the air out through the nasal cavity. Liquid is a cover term for [l] and [r], sounds that are perhaps the hardest to define and the most variable across languages. Glides, such as [w, j], are vowel-like and immediately precede or follow vowels. Place of articulation refers to the place where the air is constricted: the lips for labial [p, b, m, f, v], the teeth for dental [θ, ð], the ridge behind the upper teeth for alveolar [t, d, n, s, z, l, r], the front of the palate for alveo-palatal [∫, ʒ, t∫, dʒ], the palate for [j], the back of the palate for velar [k, g, ŋ], and the glottis for glottal [’, h].

This change occurs only before voiceless consonants, and the result is that the vowels in ice and eyes are different. In Section 1, we examined a spelling irregularity involving [k]. This irregularity can be explained using the front-back distinction in vowels. Words that are originally English use a c before a back vowel (cool, could, copper) and a k before a front vowel (king, kitchen, keep). Length is also relevant: after a long vowel (or a consonant), the spelling of [k] is k (wake, week, snake, work, wink) and after a short vowel, it is c(k) (sick, Nick, sack).

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A History of the English Language: Revised edition by Elly van Gelderen


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